About the Initiative

Taking a united approach toward recovery

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Together we can learn more. The more voices contributing to the RECOVER Initiative, the more meaningful and inclusive the answers will be to understanding, treating, and preventing the long-term effects of COVID.

Explore the Initiative

Who We Are

Who We Are

The RECOVER Initiative brings together patients, caregivers, clinicians, community leaders, and scientists from across the nation to understand, prevent, and treat PASC, including Long COVID.

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs share important facts about the RECOVER Initiative and can help you understand what we currently know about the long-term effects of COVID.

Research Questions

Research Questions

The RECOVER Initiative is using the best science to advance our understanding of recovery from the long-term effects of COVID.

Many voices. One goal. Meaningful answers.

Progress is happening and what's being accomplished is historic in scale and scientific innovation.

77M+

People with a SARS-CoV-2 infection in the US ... and counting

10%-30%

Preliminary estimate of the percentage of people infected with SARS-CoV-2 who will experience PASC

200+

Number of researchers involved in RECOVER

200+

Number of RECOVER research clinical sites

RECOVER is Powered by Collaboration

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Progress takes teamwork.

Many of the country's leading researchers have come together to form a brilliant team known as the RECOVER Consortium. Given RECOVER's national scale and scope, the Consortium prioritizes harmonization as a key strategy to getting meaningful answers. In spring 2021, more than 30 institutions were awarded funds to participate in the development of—and successfully completed—main protocols to achieve harmonization. Patients and representatives of patient organizations joined in this critical step for RECOVER.

A set of main protocols:

  • Serves as the Consortium's playbook by enabling researchers to speak the same language, use the same methods, and examine the same types of data.
  • Allows data collected from many participants by different research groups to be compared and analyzed, helping to speed up the research process and provide more meaningful, reliable findings.

With RECOVER's main protocols completed, additional funding was awarded in fall 2021 establishing the RECOVER Consortium and providing the infrastructure to advance RECOVER's research studies.

View the main protocols for RECOVER studies:

Adult Participation (PDF, 1.2 MB)
Pediatric Participation (PDF, 2.3 MB)

A summary of the adult and pediatric protocols will be available soon.

Progress takes participants.

The RECOVER Initiative is inclusive by design and will involve a pool of tens of thousands of participants across multiple cohorts. Creating a research initiative that ensures a diverse group of participants reflecting the Nation's population is essential so that the results and findings can be broadly applied.

A meta-cohort study design pools multiple groups of people together that share a common characteristic. In this case, participants will be people who have experienced an infection of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. To serve as a participant in RECOVER research studies, different studies will have different requirements. RECOVER will also seek to enroll participants without SARS-CoV-2 infection to serve as a comparison group.

NIH National Institutes of Health leading to Biorepository Core, Data Resource Core, Clinical Science Core, and Administrative Coordinating Center; which leads to the RECOVER Consortium into Research Infrastructure then RECOVER Participants. All of this makes up the Research StudiesNIH National Institutes of Health leading to Biorepository Core, Data Resource Core, Clinical Science Core, and Administrative Coordinating Center; which leads to the RECOVER Consortium into Research Infrastructure then RECOVER Participants. All of this makes up the Research Studies
Find Studies near you at:
studies.recovercovid.org
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